Coral reefs are said to have the highest diversity of life any ecosystem on the planet – even more than tropical rainforests. Occupying less than one percent of the ocean floor, coral reefs are home to more than 25% of our oceans’ marine life. 

You won’t believe how many creatures call the Great Barrier Reef home.

7 September is National Threatened Species Day

Layer 107.jpg

Fish

1625 species

Coral

Coral

600 types

Bird

Birds

215 species

Manta Ray, Manta alfredi

Sharks and Rays

133 varieties

dolphin pantropical_spotted.jpg

Whales and Dolphins

30 species

Layer 48.jpg

Echinoderms

630 species

Mantis Shrimp

Crustaceans

1300 species

db2151.jpg

Molluscs

More than 3000 types

Layer 106.jpg

jellyfish

More than 100 species

Green Turtle

Sea turtles

6 out of the world's 7 species

Bulb Tentacle Sea Anenome

Sea anemones

40 species

Layer 3.jpg

bryozoa

950 species

Fan Worm

worms

500 species

dc2225.jpg

marine insects

More than 20 species

dc8377.jpg

sponges

Around 2000 species

db8267.jpg

sea squirts

Around 720 species

​* National Threatened Species Day

On the night of 7 September 1936, the last Tasmanian tiger died in Hobart Zoo. With this death, the thylacine species became extinct.

In 1996, the 60th anniversary of the last Tasmanian tiger’s death, 7 September was declared ‘National Threatened Species Day’. 

On this day, we're reminded to reflect on what happened to the thylacine and how we must all act to ensure a similar fate does not await other native animals and plants.